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Worming Goats for Internal Parasites

Worming goats is becoming an increasingly controversial topic, probably due in part to the large amount of misinformation out there.  However, one fact is true. Worms have developed resistance to most of the chemical wormers out there.  I am not a Veterinarian; however, I have composed a list of what currently works for me, and is demonstrating less parasite resistance.  Do your homework for best results, and if in doubt, contact a good goat vet.

 Quest 2% Gel (horse wormer; drug name Moxidectin)  This is the horse wormer style of the current brand name sheep drench Cydectin.  Effective against barberpole worms in my herd and geographical area.  Chemical is weight sensitive, so weigh goat before worming.  Dose is 1cc/110 lbs. (1 "notch"/50 lbs.) Using the horse wormer style is much cheaper than a bottle of Cydectin drench.  Safety during pregnancy has not been established.  Probably best to avoid use during this time.

Ivermectin (Ivomec and generics)  Dose injected, liquid form ORALLY at the rate of 1 cc per 22 lbs.  Safe for pregnant does.  Effective against mites and lice on skin.  I use generic ivermectin horse wormer in tubes, as I have it available and it is much cheaper.

Valbazen (drug name albendazole)  Effective for tapeworms in kids, and mild tapes in adults.  DO NOT give to pregnant does as it has shown to cause abortion.  Dose the doe ORALLY immediately after kidding at the rate of 1 cc per 10 lbs.

Praziquantel (often combined with ivermectin)  I use praziquantel in a horse wormer called Zimecterin Gold, or one called Equimax.  (Equimax, made by Pfizer, actually has more ivermectin and praziquantel in it than Zimecterin Gold.)  
Both of these products contain ivermectin and praziquantel, but it is the "prazi" that is so effective against resistant tapeworm loads.  I worm according to the marking increments on the side of the tube of wormer. I always round up for a goat's weight.  For example, if a goat weighs 60 lbs., I will worm at the 100 lb. notch on the tube.  I would never round down to the nearest weight, say from 60 lbs. to the 50 lb. notch.  Under dosing actually promotes parasite resistance.
 I will use it once every 10 days for 3 weeks.  Very important to do this as it will kill the different migrating, larval stages of the tapes.  One will often find this called worming "10-10-10."

Clorsulon  (Often combined with ivermectin, as in "Ivomec Plus" or "Noromectin Plus.")  Only true weapon against liver flukes!  Dosed ORALLY (liquid injected form) at the rate of 1 cc per 30 lbs.